Retinol

Retinoids are a broad term used to refer to the vitamin A derivatives such as Tretinoin, Retin-A, Refissa, Retinol, Retin-A, and Retinyl Esters. A cell-communicating agent lipid-soluble vitamin A is a regulator of cell growth and differentiation. In layman’s terms, it can bind to the receptors in any skin cell and normalize its function. Retinoids considered to be a skin revitalizer, promoting overall skin health.

Retinols Benefits

  • Reduce wrinkles by boosting collagen production and inhibit collagen breakdown
  • Anti-inflammatory properties
  • Increase hyaluronic acid levels
  • Improves hydration
  • Exfoliating properties
  • Fight with visible signs of photoaging
  • Treat acne by decreasing sebum production
  • Reduce symptoms of eczema, psoriasis, and rosacea
  • Used to treat pre-cancerous skin lesions


How to Use Retinol

Use your Retinol serum at least twice a week. For maximum effect, if your skin feels good, apply every night as the fifth step in your evening skincare routine. If it does not tolerate well, decrease the amount of Retinol to one – two days and increase antioxidant products. In a couple weeks, gradually increase Retinol use to 4-7 days per week. Allow 3-5 minutes for the best absorption before you go to the sealing step of your skincare routine.

Precautions

Studies reported that retinyl palmitate and another vitamin A derivatives in cosmetics could contribute toxicity, increase skin sensitivity, and speed skin tumors in the presence of UV light. Ideally, apply products with high concentrations of retinyl palmitate or any other forms of Vitamin A in the evenings.

Another important point is that excess Vitamin A can cause toxicity in the body. Do not apply a double layer of serum or cream with any form of vitamin A.

Do not use Retinol in a combination with vitamin C, AHA or BHA. It can irritate your skin.

Vitamin A Forms

Prescription topical Retinoids: Tazorac, Tretinoin, Adapalene, Retin-A, and Refissa.

Retinol (weaker than Retinoids) is the most potent form of vitamin A.

Retinyl Palmitate (an ester is a weak form of Vitamin A) - more stable alternative to retinol.

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